Year: 2005

A Protein’s Possible Role in Ovarian Cancer Metastasis

More than 85 percent of ovarian cancers are epithelial, and the majority of patients with epithelial ovarian cancer are diagnosed with tumor metastases. Metastasis is the main reason for cancer recurrence…

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How Hereditary and Non-Hereditary Cancer May Have Something in Common

Mutations in the BRCA1 gene account for more than 30 percent of hereditary ovarian cancer and carriers of BRCA1 mutations have a 10 percent to 50 percent risk of acquiring ovarian cancer early in their lifetime…

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Models to Study Hereditary Ovarian Cancer

Epithelial ovarian cancers are thought to arise as a result of the accumulation of multiple genetic alterations that transform ovarian surface epithelial cells…

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Making an Antibody Treatment for Breast Cancer Work for Ovarian Cancer

Traditional chemotherapeutic drugs are effective in destroying ovarian cancer tumors, but these drugs often damage health tissues, resulting in severe side effects…

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Developing a Mouse Model of Ovarian Cancer

Disruption in a molecular pathway called pRb has been found in more than half of epithelial ovarian cancers, and correlates with lower survival rate of the patients compared with those with no disruption in the pathway. Dr…

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Novel siRNA Based Therapeutic Approaches for Ovarian Carcinoma

The goal of the M.D…

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How Ovarian Cancer Cells Might Metastasize

Ovarian cancer metastasis is a complex process involving multiple routes, one of which includes attaching to and invading the mesothelium, a membrane that forms the lining of body cavities, to grow into the tissue on the other side…

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DNA Fragments Might be a Way to Screen for Ovarian Cancer

Ovarian cancer is a leading cause of cancer deaths among women. The lack of an effective screening tool for these patients continues to result in a high mortality from the disease…

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A Possible Explanation for How Ovarian Cells Evade Immune Response

CA125 is a well-known marker for monitoring the recurrence and progression of epithelial ovarian cancer. It is now understood that CA125 is a small peptide situated on another molecule known as MUC16. Dr…

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Testing Medications for Other Conditions to Treat Ovarian Cancer

Sometimes findings from one area in biomedical research can have applications in unrelated fields. Dr. Li is studying the possibility that two non-cancer medications might benefit women with ovarian cancer…

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Could Inflammation of Ovarian Cells be the Cause of Ovarian Cancer?

For some time, scientists have believed that ovarian cancer arises because of ovulation and from levels of a pituitary hormone called gonadotropin acting on the epithelial cells on the surface of the ovary…

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Characterizing Molecular Defects in Ovarian Cancer

Biochemical pathways that control cell growth and survival are commonly altered in cancer. Understanding the particular defects in each type of cancer could lead to the development of better and more specific anti-cancer therapeutics…

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