Chi Lam Au Yeung, PhD

Chi Lam Au Yeung, PhD

Dr. Chi Lam Au Yeung is an instructor in the Department of Gynecologic Oncology and Reproductive Medicine at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. She earned her doctoral degree at the Chinese University of Hong Kong, studying the biological significance of the deregulation of microRNA expression in HPV-associated cervical cancer development. Her long-standing experience and expertise in gynecologic oncology has helped prepare her for a career dedicated to ovarian cancer research. Her postdoctoral training under the guidance of Dr. Samuel Mok was to investigate the importance of the omental tumor microenvironment in ovarian cancer progression using advanced technology. Her work was recognized by the Ann Schreiber Mentored Investigator Award from OCRA and multiple ovarian cancer-related fellowships from MD Anderson Cancer Center, including the Lupe C. Garcia Fellowship in Cancer Research and the Diane Denson Tobola Fellowship in Ovarian Cancer Research. As an instructor, Dr. Au Yeung continues to delineate underlying mechanisms that will lead to the development of alternative therapeutic strategies to improve patients’ survival. Dr. Au Yeung’s current research focuses on determining the importance of communication between different cell types in the omental microenvironment and delineating the underlying mechanism by which secretory proteins and exosomal molecules such as microRNAs modulate high-grade serous ovarian cancer progression, metastasis, and chemoresistance.

Dr. Chi Lam Au Yeung is currently a postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Gynecologic Oncology and Reproductive Medicine at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. She earned her bachelor and doctoral degrees at the Chinese University of Hong Kong in 2007 and 2011, respectively. During her graduate training, her research focused on understanding the biological significance of the deregulation of microRNA expression in human papillomavirus (HPV) associated cervical cancer development. Her current research interests include elucidating the functional roles of adipose tissue derived exosomal microRNAs in modulating ovarian cancer metastasis and chemoresistance; and delineating the roles of adipose tissue-specific secretory proteins and microRNAs in ovarian cancer progression.

[class^="wpforms-"]
[class^="wpforms-"]
[class^="wpforms-"]
[class^="wpforms-"]
[class^="wpforms-"]
[class^="wpforms-"]
[class^="wpforms-"]
[class^="wpforms-"]